3 Book Submission Blunders!

rejection-stamp

1. A shoddily written submission letter.
Your submission letter is crucial. It is the first impression you will make to a publisher. One blunder at this point and the publisher will already be critiquing your skills as a writer.

2. A inadequately edited manuscript.
While publishers have editorial departments this is not an excuse for submitting a reprehensibly revised manuscript. Publishers aren’t interested in excavating through dung to find the brilliance buried somewhere within.

3. Not following submission guidelines.
Read submission guidelines prudently. Only submit work a publisher wants.

 
Copyright © 2014 by Diane Morasco

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It’s friggin’ tough to be a writer!

I am a wriiter quote Diane Morasco
“It’s friggin’ tough to be a writer. Yeah, you are born with an intrinsic gift but you learn to be a superlative writer. I’m talking about those scribes who take you on a roller coaster adventure with their intoxicating prose, riotous laughter, the ladies and gents who give you orgasmic pleasure with every sentence you take in, the suspense aficionados that take your breath away and leave you writhing for more. Ellery Adams aka Jennifer Stanley, Allison Brennan, Parris Afton Bonds, Ellen Byerrum, Harlan Coben, Mary Higgins Clark, Mary Jane Clark, Phillip R. Craig, Saranna DeWylde, Vivi Dumas, Joya Fields, Sara Humphreys, Miranda James/Dean James, Adam Kunz, Liz/Lizbeth Lipperman, G.A. McKevett, Tim Myers, Lynda Renham, Lisa Scottoline, Erica Spindler, Wendy Corsi Staub and Gayle Trent/Amanda Lee, Laura Bradford/Elizabeth Lynn Casey are such phenomenal storytellers. They bust their biscuits and nuggets to tell compelling tales that seem effortlessly plotted and they do it because they love what they do…or they are just bananas. They set the bar every single time. I am in awe of their gifts. They are absolutely extraordinary scribes. When folks think their writing profession is not working out, it’s not working out because it’s so friggin’ strenuous and these writers prove it can be done .” —Diane Morasco

Unleashing the Writer Within

writing-tips
Okay, let’s get down to the nitty gritty and talk about unleashing the writer within. Yes, I know, I know, you are writing…in your head. I’m not sayin’ some of you aren’t busting your biscuits and nuggets because you are. I hear the expletives, shrieks and hurling of writing paraphernalia against walls during temper tantrums from my abode near the Hudson River. Oh, wait a sec, that’s me. Good gravy! *wink*

“Once upon a time…” When we contemplate about that book we plan to write “eventually,” we tend to find (and exhaust) every excuse that thwarts us from taking the first step—actually writing. Let’s cut the poop, cookie cakes, these feeble justifications are nothing but, well, ah, poop. It is just a reason to dawdle because we are fearful.

Here are a few tips to get you not just thinking about writing, but actually writing.

  • Begin now. Grab your writing gear, find a location to park your derrière and start writing.
  • Have a blast. Enjoy your writing journey.
  • Build your writing community. Join writing groups and critique groups. Attend classes, conferences and workshops to hone your craft.
  • Be willing to stumble. It’s perfectly acceptable to stumble. What isn’t acceptable is not getting back up and writing again. We learn when we stumble. We improve when we stumble. We get stronger when we stumble. We get smarter when we stumble. How so? We don’t hit the asphalt as hard as we did the first few times because we progress every single time we stumble.
  • Share your writing with individuals you feel comfortable with. It’s crucial to surround yourself with constructive fortification.
  • Treat yourself. It’s vital to reward yourself for all of your hard work. Writing is tough. Treat yourself well and treat yourself often.

 

Copyright © 2014 by Diane Morasco

9 Tips For New Writers

writing scrabble

 

  1. Know your target audience.
  2. Create genuine characters.
  3. Study your craft.
  4. Read.
  5. Illustrate, do not voice.
  6. Don’t stray away from the plot.
  7. Design memorable scenes.
  8. Know your genre.
  9. Revise. Revise. Revise.

Copyright © 2014 by Diane Morasco

Five Tips for Writing More Effectively!

writing typewriter

  1. Read out loud: Reading a section out loud helps you recognize awkward passages.
  2. Trim the fat: Whereas you will probably add a few words while editing, you should be eliminating words.
  3. Put it aside: Wait a few days before beginning the editing process. Placing your work aside for a few days allows your noggin to forget what you toiled away at; allowing your brain to comprehend what is actually written down.
  4. Say what you mean: Convey it clearly straight out the gate, and then move on.
  5. Substantiate yourself: Every word should have a purpose to be in your piece; if it doesn’t, remove it.

 

Copyright © 2014 by Diane Morasco